JC010: Mud volcanoes and submarine canyons


 JC10



Cruise diary


Day 22: Friday 1 June 2007....the last day!!
Position: Latitude 35º, Longitude 7º, Bearing: Cadiz!
Weather: Clear


Gill writes:

"The final day of Leg 1 has arrived. There is still some activity as we revisit Darwin but the cores will be stowed in a cold container until we reach Southampton. The ROV has done its last dive of this leg. Packing is seriously underway. The decks are a hive of activity.

Throughout the cruise the scientists and crew have been exceptionally helpful. I am really grateful that everyone on the ship has really bought into the idea of having teachers on board. They were all very enthusiastic about spreading the word to schoolchildren via the website. Without this support our job would have been much more difficult.

Life on board ship is something I will never forget. People who have experienced it try to explain what it is like but until you have tried it for yourself it is impossible to really comprehend.   Now we have reached the end the time seems to have evaporated and the past three weeks are suddenly condensed into a capsule which I will always be able to think about and reflect on. The highlight for me has definitely been seeing the seabed with the ROV and some of our favourite sightings are on the web today.

It just remains to say thank you to everyone on board. To all the crew who have looked after us so well, to the technicians who have done a fantastic job, to all the scientists who have patiently explained their work to us, to Eduard – a really supportive colleague, and to Vikki back at NOC for guiding us through. I realise I am very lucky to have this fantastic opportunity and for all the support I have been given.  I am really looking forward to getting back to school to share my experiences with the children I teach and to enthusing  them about marine  science."


Eduard writes:

"When I arrived to Vigo and I saw the RRS James Cook I felt hugely animated. I was eager to get on board. Participating in this HERMES research cruise has offered me the unique opportunity to experience deep-sea research first hand and in close relationship with leading European scientists. At first I was quite nervous, to be honest. I felt like a little first time sailor in an English vessel. I was, actually. Everything was new. Fortunately, all the crew have been very helpful from the first day, so very quickly I got used to the life on board. The next step was trying to do my best to involve the students in science.

While I was observing I tried to do my best writing the blog, taking photos and filming video.  I have felt like an authentic journalist following a good reportage!

Many of my students were reading the blog and I received questions from them to solve. I could respond some of them by myself, but all the rest I had to ask to the crew to get a correct answer. The questions were so diverse. The students asked not only about scientific matters. They asked about life at sea. That is a big question, isn’t it? It is difficult to answer after only three weeks. The leg has just finished. I am impressed. I would be wrong if I said I had entirely got the picture. I just have an impression. This encourages me to go further. There are so many things I still have to learn about life at sea and deep-sea science!

Now it is time to go back to Barcelona. Time to meet my students again and share with them all the experiences I have just had. I hope by sharing these experiences with my students that they will come to get into the science and use it to keep the science progressing in the future.

I would like to thank to HERMES project and NOCS for giving me this magnificent opportunity. Thank you to all the crew (the scientific team, the officers, the catering, technicians, seamen and engineers). All of them have been so kind and helpful! Thank you to Vikki for her logistic help from Southampton. Special thanks for Gill. She has been very patient with me. Thank you for help me to improve my English. Finally, I would not want to forget Eva, a scientist from the NOCS who is working in Barcelona. Thank you!"

Toadfish

Tripod fish

Sea urchins

Octopus

The team!



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Diaries from Leg 2 will follow soon - check back after 4 June!


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