JC010: Mud volcanoes and submarine canyons


 JC10



Glossary

Use our guide to look up the specialist words and phrases used on board the ship


Term

Definition

A

 

Aft

The back/stern end of the ship.

B

 

Boat Deck

Between the Fo’c’sle and Mezzanine decks, the Boat deck has the conference room and the quarters of the Engineers, Crew and Chefs.

Bow

The front, slightly pointed end of the ship. (Pronounced B-ow, rather than bo)

Bow wave

A wave that is created as the ship pushes forward. Dolphins can often be seen to play in the bow waves of large ships.

Bridge

The area where the controls, navigation equipment and charts of the ship are held, and where the Captain and ship’s officers are based. They have a 360° view out over the ship and surrounding water so that they can see everything around them. The ship is controlled from the bridge.

C

 

Chart

A map outlining the details of the sea, including depths and obstacles. The navigating officer must be able to use these should any electronic equipment fail.

CTD

Conductivity Temperature & Density. These can all be measured using a special piece of equipment.

D

 

 

 

E

 

ETO

Electro-Technical Officer – The onboard electronics & electrical engineer

 

 

F

 

Fo’c’sle deck

The fo’c’sle or forecastle deck (pronounced folk-sl however it’s spelled!) is the second highest level on the ship. On the James Cook, it has an outside deck area where we stood to watch the ship departing Cadiz. It also houses the offices and cabins of the ships officers.

Fore

The front/bow end of the ship.

G

 

 

 

H

 

Hull

The outer metal shell of the ship.

I

 

Immersion Suit

A special all in one suit designed to be waterproof, and prolong life by approx. 6 hours if someone were to fall into the sea. There is one on board ship for every person and they are only worn if an abandon ship signal is given.

Isis

The name of the ROV carried by the RRS James Cook

J

 

 

 

K

 

Keel

The large structural beam that the ship is built around, it sits at the bottom of the hull, giving ships a distinctive shape.

L

 

Lifeboat

A bright orange boat that is deployed if the ship is in trouble and lives are in danger. The RRS James Cook carries two lifeboats. Each is big enough to take the entire crew, but it is preferential to keep each boat at half capacity so that there are additional water and food rations. The lifeboats are boarded from the ship, on the fo’c’sle deck, and then freefall to the water below. Everyone must be strapped in. By boarding the lifeboat from the fo’c’sle deck it ensures that people don’t get wet.

Liferaft

The ship has 6 liferafts that can be deployed if the lifeboats aren’t operating. These are boarded by a long rope ladder that is thrown over the side of the ship.

Lower deck

The water ballast and engine room are situated on the lower deck; the lowest of all the decks.

M

 

Main deck

This is the level has the scientists cabins, a small gym, sauna, laundry.

Master

The captain of the ship.

Mezzanine

The middle deck; The lounge, galley, library, tv room, fridges and freezers are on the mezzanine deck.

Muster

Another word meaning to meet.

Muster Station

The place where we meet if there is an emergency. The scientists all meet in the hangar (see Gill & Eduard’s article on the labs).

N

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

P

 

Port

The left hand side of the ship when facing the bow.

Porthole

A small round window in the side of the ship. Most cabins don’t have a view out onto the sea, but a lucky few do. By making the windows round, helps to maintain the strength of the hull.

All portholes have storm covers which can be used for extra protection in bad weather, and also to shut out the light. Storm covers are found on the inside of the ship.

Purser

The ship’s officer responsible for accommodation, catering, stores, finance and administration on board the ship. His role is similar to that of a hotel services manager.

Q

 

 

 

R

 

ROV

Remote Operated Vehicle (see the article written by Gill & Eduard)

ROV pilot

The member of the ROV operations team who is steering and guiding the ROV to its destination and then carries out the experiments using the various pieces of equipment carried by the ROV.

S

 

SAPS

Stand Alone Pumping System. More on this, with pictures coming soon.

Starboard

The right hand side of the ship when facing the bow.

Steam

To travel/sail a specified distance

Stern

The back end of the ship. On the RRS James Cook, the ROV and other equipment is deployed from the stern.

T

 

 

 

U

 

Upper Deck

This is below the mezzanine deck. The upper deck has the labs, hospital and coffee shop (a small tea room!).

V

 

Van

The two conjoined crates that make up the control room and observation/recording desk for the ROV Isis.

W

 

Watch

A ‘shift’. The day is split into watches. Teams run certain pieces of equipment throughout their watch, and during other watches have time to rest or carry out other duties. The ship’s officers are on 8 hour watches. This means they spend 8 hrs on the bridge. The other 16 hours are used for rest and to carry out other responsibilities such as checking equipment.

Watchkeeper

Someone working on a watch.

I will be one of the watchkeepers on the 4-8 watch. This means I must be in the ROV van from 4am-8am and from 4pm-8pm. 

X

 

 

 

Y

 

 

 

Z

 

 

If you have any questions, please ask us using our Question and Answer page!



Home -

About

-

Latest news

-
Cruises
-
Learn
-
Facts
-
For teachers
-
Contact us

© NOCS 2007